September 2015 World Race Route 3


From Central America to Southeast Asia and and central Africa - this route hits three continents and is sure to be an adventure!

Costa Rica

Costa Rica

A hot spot for surfing, Costa Rica is an adventure seeker’s paradise. Between its stunning beaches, lush rainforests, and beautiful people, it’s easy to enjoy "pura vida" there. Outside of the tourist destinations, however, are large pockets of poverty and family brokenness throughout the nation. The country itself is transitioning from self-sufficient farming lifestyles to more urban living. Traditional morals and lifestyles are giving way to a modern, consumer-oriented world. The people of Costa Rica need to remember the unchanging love of Jesus—and that it is still real and relevant to their lives. Will you GO?


Nicaragua

Nicaragua

Called “The Land of Lakes and Volcanoes,” thick rainforests, rugged highlands, and beautiful beaches define Nicaragua’s beautiful landscape. Its rich history dates back to the Spanish conquistadores. However, hopelessness, addiction, destitution, and poverty plague many in Nicaragua. The poorest nation in Central America, almost 80% of Nicaraguans live on less than $2 a day. One in four Nicaraguans is either starving or suffering from malnutrition. Entire families live on and scrounge for scraps in city dumps. The people of Nicaragua need to know they are seen, loved, and not forgotten by God. Will you share this life-changing truth with them?


Honduras

Honduras

"Hondo" comes from the Spanish word for depth and there's lots of depth to Honduras. It's home to the Aztec and Mayan civilizations, whose ruins are still stand. Honduras is mostly mountainous and the weather's as tropical as it gets. What really runs deep in Honduras are its needs. Honduras is the third poorest in the region, after Haiti and Nicaragua. Like her neighbors, Honduras has had her of share political/military troubles, e.g., the six-month constitutional crisis in 2009. There's a need to reach out to the youth, not just to keep them out of trouble (e.g., gangs) but for them to know their worth and that they're loved.


Philippines

Philippines

Known for its diverse terrain of mountains, volcanoes, and beaches, the Philippines is a popular haven for tourists. A melting pot of cultures, religion, and tradition, the beautiful people of the Philippines are very diverse, with influences from America, Spain, and other Asian countries. More than a getaway for Westerners, this 7,000 island archipelago is home to many who earn less than 15 cents per day—giving them the status of “ultra poor”. In order to survive, some have resorted to prostitution and human trafficking. Will you share the freedom of life in Christ in the Philippines?


Vietnam

Vietnam

After nearly a century of French rule, in the mid-20th century, Vietnam was split into communist (north) and non-communist (south) halves. By 1975, Vietnam was made whole again, but as a communist country. Even with the economic reforms and restoration of diplomatic ties human rights are limited in Vietnam, especially freedom of religion; most of Vietnam is Buddhist, less than 10% is Catholic. You’ll find yourself teaching English or working in cafes forming relationships and friendships with the locals, ultimately to share the love of the Father.


Cambodia

Cambodia

Cambodia boasts the famous Angkor Wat, a Hindu temple that later became a Buddhist monastery. Hidden for centuries under dense jungle, today Angkor Wat is one of most photographed places in the world. Cambodia itself is struggling to heal from one of the worst genocides in modern history. In the 1970’s, the Khmer Rouge killed over 1.5 million men, women, and children. Faced with inconceivable poverty and desperation, Cambodia became a source, transit point, and destination for human trafficking. The people of Cambodia are hungry for hope and healing. Will you share it with them?


Laos

Laos

Following a brutal civil war, Laos came under communist rule in 1975. Therevada Buddhism and spirit worship dominate Laos with Christian missionary work monitored by the government. This ruggedly beautiful nation is home to some of the most unreached hill tribes in the world. The need is great for people to bring God’s love to the isolated places in Laos.


Malaysia

Malaysia

Located in Southeast Asia, Malaysia has one of the most competitive economies in all of Asia. Known for the tallest twin towers in the world, the Petronas Towers, it is a rising power in our global economy. With a large number of immigrants from India, Thailand, China, and Burma, Malaysia is culturally rich, with heavy influences of Hinduism and Buddhism. However, this culturally diverse and rapidly developing nation is mostly Muslim. With 61% of the population practicing Islam and 19% claiming Buddhism, the majority of Malaysians have never heard the Gospel. Will you share the love of Jesus in Malaysia?


Honduras

Malawi

Home to at least a dozen distinct people groups, Malawi is known as “the Warm Heart of Africa”. Wide varieties of cuisine and breathtaking views make Malawi a unique experience that you can’t get anywhere else on earth. But the people of Malawi are dying. One in ten adults live with HIV/AIDS, and 70% of all of Malawi’s hospital beds are occupied by people suffering from the disease. The epidemic causes overcrowded orphanages, a lack of workers to harvest food, and an attitude of hopelessness. The people of Malawi need hope. Will you share it with them?


Zambia

Zambia

With the country near the bottom of the United Nations Human Development Index, the Zambian people still suffer from poverty, short life expectancy, malnourishment, lack of clean water, and the AIDS crisis. Zambia needs encouragement from missionaries who can remind them of God’s faithfulness in the face of challenges.


Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe

Formerly the British colony of Rhodesia, Zimbabwe shares the majestic Victoria Falls with Zambia. Yet despite its natural beauty and resources like gold and diamonds, this country struggles for hope. Amnesty International reports that the current government has allowed human rights violations in Zimbabwe to escalate for years, and a recent economic meltdown has led thousands to emigrate to other countries, or be displaced within the country. While 75% of Zimbabweans claim Christianity as their faith, it’s often mixed with tribal practices and ancestral worship. Will you share God’s love in a country hungry for hope?



Race route is subject to change